Can you imagine ONE TRILLION dollars?
What would it look like?

One million dollars in new crisp one hundred dollar bills would occupy about 0.4 cubic feet and would fit into a typical brief case. (One million dollars in new one hundred dollar bills would weigh about 22.04623 lbs, one gram per bill.)

One billion dollars in new crisp one hundred dollar bills would occupy about 400 cubic feet and would fill a space 5 feet high, 8 feet wide and 10 feet long. One million dollars in new one hundred dollar bills would weigh about 22,046.23 lbs, one gram per bill.)

One trillion dollars in new crisp one hundred dollar bills would occupy about 400,000 cubic feet and would fill over 168 forty foot shipping containers. If those forty foot shipping containers were to be placed end to end, the string of those forty foot shipping containers would extend over 1.27 miles. One trillion dollars in new one hundred dollar bills would weigh about 22,046,226 lbs, one gram per bill.)

See my calculations:

A Federal Reserve note is stated to have a
Length of 6.14 inches, a
Width of 2.61 inches, and a
Thickness of .0043 inches.

The volume of a Federal Reserve note can be calculated by multiplying the Length times the Width times the Thickness. Or by using the formula L x W x T = Volume

For a volume of: 0.06890922 cubic inches.

MILLION

One million dollars in new crisp one hundred dollar bills would require ($1,000,000.00 divided by 100 (move the decimal 2 places to the left)) 10,000 one hundred dollar bills.
100 x 10,000 = 1,000,000

If one bill occupies 0.06890922 cubic inches (cu. in.), then 10,000 bills would occupy 689.0922 cubic inches.

A cubic foot contains 12 x 12 x 12 cu. in or 1728 cu. in.

Therefore 689.0922 cu. in. divided by 1728 cu. in. equals about 0.3987802083 cubic feet (cu. ft.), which is almost 0.4 cu. ft. A typical brief case can hold .4 cu. ft. of material. So, a typical brief case can hold $1,000,000.00 in new crisp one hundred dollar bills.

BILLION

1000 times one million is one billion. Therefore, if we multiply the space occupied by $1,000,000.00 in new crisp one hundred dollar bills by 1000, we would have the space which one billion dollars in new crisp one hundred dollar bills would occupy.

0.3987802083 cu. ft. times 1000 equals (move the decimal three places to the right) 398.7802083 cu. ft., or just under 400 cubic feet. 400 cubic feet can be thought of as a block of new crisp one hundred dollar bills which would measure, (factor 400) 5 feet high, 8 feet wide and 10 feet long. That would be the space a billion dollars in new one hundred dollar bills could occupy.

TRILLION

1000 times one billion is one trillion. Therefore, if we multiply the space occupied by $1,000,000,000.00 in new crisp one hundred dollar bills by 1000, we would have the space which one trillion dollars in new crisp new hundred dollar bills would occupy.

398.7802083 cu. ft. times 1000 equals (move the decimal three places to the right) 398,780.2083 cu. ft.

How many 40 foot shipping containers would be required to hold that much volume? Well letís see.
The official inside measurements of a 40 foot shipping container (sea can) is:
Inside Length is 39.41666667 feet long,
Inside Width is 7.666666667 feet wide, and
Inside Height is 7.833333333 feet high.

L x W x H = Volume.

39.41666667 (length in feet) x 7.666666667 (width in feet) x 7.833333333 (height in feet) = 2367.189815 cubic feet.
Thus the volume of a 40 foot sea can = 2367.189815 cu. ft.

398,780.2083 cu. ft. divided by the volume of a 40 foot sea can, 2367.189815 cu. ft., equals 168.4614414 sea cans.

Each sea can is 40 feet long.
A mile is 5280 feet long.
If we multiply 40 times 168.4614414 we get 6738.458 feet. As there is 5280 feet in a mile, if we divide 6738.458 by 5280 we get 1.276223. Therefore if we placed the 40 foot sea cans end to end, the line of sea cans required to contain one trillion dollars in crisp new one hundred dollar bills would be over 1.27 miles long.

>The approximate weight of a currency note, regardless of denomination is (1) one gram.



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